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Homeowners Affected by Changes to Flood Zone Maps

By on Jun 29, 2013 in Uncategorized |

June 28, 2013 Homeowners in Minnesota take notice. You might have a target on your back. That’s because FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is updating its flood plain maps for half of the counties in the state. One of them is Hennepin County.  The review is especially upsetting to some folks in Edina. 900 residents got a letter in the mail from City Hall, telling them their home is now considered to be in a flood plain.  And the consequences could be costly. Read...

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FEMA Releases Preliminary Work Maps for Four New Jersey Counties

By on Jun 18, 2013 in Uncategorized |

June 17, 2013 TRENTON, NJ – The Federal Emergency Management Agency is releasing preliminary work maps for four New Jersey counties heavily impacted by Superstorm Sandy – Hudson, Monmouth, Ocean and Atlantic. The preliminary work maps for those counties will replace the Advisory Base Flood Elevation maps because they reflect a more precise modeling analysis of current flood hazards, including wave analysis, and a more detailed study of other specific conditions that could affect flood risk. FEMA is working closely with New Jersey’s local and state officials to provide the most accurate updated flood risk information to those individuals who need it as they make decisions about rebuilding their homes. Revision of these maps is an ongoing process leading to the final Flood Insurance Rate Maps. The final maps will incorporate previous data and add more details about specific flood risk conditions in communities throughout the state, with a priority placed on those in coastal areas facing the highest risk. Before Superstorm Sandy struck, FEMA was in the process of updating flood hazard maps for the New Jersey coast. Soon after Sandy, FEMA released Advisory Base Flood Elevations which incorporated much of the information contained in the study already under way. Because Sandy had reshaped the coastline, not all the earlier information was applicable. The Advisory Base Flood Elevations represented the best information available at the time, and served as a guide for those who wanted to rebuild as soon as possible. Additional information about the coastal mapping efforts and Hurricane Sandy recovery can be found on the Region 2 Coastal Analysis Mapping website:...

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Updated Flood Maps Show How Vulnerable New York City Really Is..

By on Jun 16, 2013 in Uncategorized |

The Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA) released new flood insurance maps for New York City and ProPublica has released a nifty interactive map showing how the zones will look if the city actually floods. This new set of maps replaces those drawn up in 1983, and reveal that twice as many structures now sit in flood zones, according to ProPublica. The darker the color of the water, the deeper the flooding. Damage to buildings, from least to greatest, goes from light yellow to deep red. Bloomberg is already at work on a $20 billion plan to protect the waterfront in lower Manhattan and another plan to protect one square mile of Staten Island’s eastern waterfront, where 11 people died during the storm. But the subway systems really aren’t ready for a hurricane yet — and they won’t be for years. The differences in the maps for this one square mile of Staten Island are shocking. Here are what they thought were the flood zones in 2007:...

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FEMA Urges Residents to Take Steps to Prepare for Tropical Storm Andrea and Listen to Local Officials

By on Jun 7, 2013 in Uncategorized |

June 6, 2013 WASHINGTON – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), through its regional offices in Atlanta, Ga. and Philadelphia, Pa. is monitoring the conditions of Tropical Storm Andrea. As Tropical Storm Andrea approaches Florida, FEMA urges citizens to closely monitor the storm and take steps to be as prepared as possible, in advance of severe weather and most importantly, follow the direction of state, tribal and local officials. FEMA remains in close contact with state, tribal and local officials in Florida and all hurricane prone states to ensure they have the resources they need in preparation for Andrea and for the 2013 hurricane season.  FEMA has increased the operational status of the National Watch Center in Washington, D.C. to an enhanced watch and a liaison is on site at the Florida emergency operations center to assist in coordination efforts. This storm is projected to bring significant rainfall and the risk for flash flooding in many areas. Remember to stay away from flood waters.  Driving through a flooded area can be extremely hazardous and almost half of all flash flood deaths happen in vehicles. When in your car, look out for flooding in low lying areas, at bridges, and at highway dips. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle.  Remember – turn around, don’t drown. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service, as of 11 a.m., Tropical Storm Andrea is located 110 miles south-southeast of Apalachicola, Fla. with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph. On the forecast track, the center of Andrea will reach the coast of the Big Bend area later today and then move northeastward near the East Coast of the United States through Saturday.  No significant change of strength is expected before the center reaches the coast later today.  Some weakening is forecast tonight and early Friday while the center of Andrea moves over land. “Now is the time to ensure your family is prepared, monitor storm conditions and follow the instructions of state, tribal and local officials,” said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate.  “With the increased risk of storm surge and flash flooding, remember to stay out of the water. Turn around, don’t...

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FEMA Releases Preliminary Flood Hazard Information for Ventura County

By on Jun 7, 2013 in Uncategorized |

June 6, 2013 OAKLAND, Calif. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is working with the Ventura County Watershed Protection District to update flood hazard risk information.  FEMA released preliminary flood maps that will help community officials, individuals and business owners identify known flood risks.  When finalized, the maps will be used for flood insurance, land use, and development decisions.  The revised maps are digital, incorporating the latest technology to identity flood risk based on detailed engineering models, decades of rainfall, storm gauge information, and current topographic data. The preliminary flood maps propose changes to portions of San Antonio Creek, Reeves Creek, Thacher Creek, and McNell Creek near the city of Ojai and Ventura County.  Flood hazard information on the preliminary maps will reflect an overall decrease in special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or high risk areas. Although there is an overall decrease of flood risk, it is important individuals and business owners review the preliminary flood maps to determine risks and make informed decisions. Individuals and business owners who believe the proposed flood maps contain errors will be able to submit appeals by providing scientific or technical information through their community officials to FEMA. Once all appeals are resolved, FEMA will make any necessary updates to the study and notify community officials.  Floodplain administrators in each community have copies of the maps available for public viewing. Flooding is the most common disaster in the United States.  Homeowners, renters and business owners are encouraged to look at the preliminary flood maps to become familiar with flood risks in their community.  These flood maps can help individuals and businesses make informed decisions about flood insurance options and flood protection measures. For more information about flood insurance or to find a local agent, visit www.floodsmart.gov. For questions about flood maps, visit http://msc.fema.gov, call 877-FEMA-MAP (877-336-2627) or email...

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